Mexico recovers sculptures from the University of Miami

Mexico recovers sculptures from the University of Miami

The government has announced that the Museo de México recovered three sculptures that the University of Miami possessed unlawfully. Among these archaeological objects is the "Snake head”, A basalt sculpture dated from 900 to 1200 AD, in the Highlands of Central Mesoamerica. These remains reach 39.9 x 85 centimeters.

It has also been recovered "Tlaloc, the god of rain”, Piece of basalt belonging to the second century after Christ that measures 71 x 40.6 cm.

The third work is about the “Nobleman or priest”, Created between 200 BC. and 600 AD, also made of basalt, comes from the coast of the Gulf of Mexico and measures 1.46 meters in height.

The researchers show that these remains are related to the illegal operations of Leonardo Augustus Pattersonthe Mexican foreign minister declared in a statement. "Patterson is currently in custody in Spain, and is charged with illegal antiquities trafficking”He added.

The return of the works took place on August 15 in collaboration with the Lowe Art Museum, UM, which has been helpful in clarifying that the items had been taken illegally.

I am currently studying Journalism and Audiovisual Communication at the Rey Juan Carlos University, which has made me inclined towards the international section, including the study of languages. For this reason, I do not rule out dedicating myself to teaching. I also like to practice physical exercise and spend a pleasant time chatting with my acquaintances and with new people. Lastly, I enjoy traveling to know the authentic culture of each region of the world, although I admit that before I need to find out as much as possible about the place I'm going to visit, to fully enjoy the experience.


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